Equality, Diversity and Inclusion

Spring Conference 2024
#PsychConf

18 & 19 April,
Mullingar Park Hotel
Co. Westmeath

13 External CPD credits (7 Thursday + 6 Friday)

PROGRAMME

FROM 8:30 | REGISTRATION & POSTER EXHIBITION

LOCATION: FOYER

09:30 | WELCOME ADDRESS  

LOCATION: LIR SUITE

Dr Lorcan Martin, President, College of Psychiatrists of Ireland

9.40 – 9.50 | LAUNCH OF NEW DIVERSITY IN PSYCHIATRY SPECIAL INTEREST GROUP

LOCATION: LIR SUITE

 

9:50 – 10:45 | OTHERSNESS & OTHERING

LOCATION: LIR SUITE

CHAIRED BY: DR MARY SCRIVEN

PROFESSOR DINESH BHUGRA, PROFESSOR EMERITUS OF MENTAL HEALTH & CULTURAL DIVERSITY, KINGS COLLEGE LONDON

Identity is a complex concept that can be informed by various factors, involving biological, psychological, experiential, and social influences. Specifically, one’s social identity refers to the ways in which individuals can adopt attributes from established collective categories, like cultural identities, ethnic identities, gender identities, and class identities, amongst others. Social identity can encompass unique and diverse interactions at an individual level, known as micro-identities, that may be selectively expressed, hidden, or downplayed, contingent on distinct sociocultural settings. However, the formation of social identity is recurrently defined in opposition to perceptions of the Other, which can entail adverse paradigms of marginalisation, stigma, and discrimination. Although this theory of Otherness has been developed across different fields, particularly sociology, it may be important in psychiatric contexts as it can engender inherent risk factors and mental health inequalities. Consequently, this paper seeks to bring attention towards these issues, exploring the construction of Otherness and its detrimental outcomes for psychiatry, such as systemic discrimination and disparities in therapeutic support, alongside recommended initiatives to mitigate against the effects of Otherness. This may require multifactorial approaches that include cultural competency training, interventions informed by micro-identities and intersectionality, patient advocacy, and structural changes to mental health policy.

10:45 – 11:15 | COFFEE BREAK

11:15 – 12:30 | IMPACT OF PATIENT SUICIDE STUDY                                         

LOCATION: LIR SUITE

CO-CHAIRED BY PROF AOIBHIN LYNCH & PROF ANNE DOHERTY

EFFECTS OF PATIENT SUICIDE ON THE PERSONAL & PROFESSIONAL LIVES OF PSYCHIATRISTS & PSYCHIATRISTS IN TRAINING IN IRELAND: A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY

DR PAUL CORCORAN, HEAD OF RESEARCH, NATIONAL SUICIDE RESEARCH FOUNDATION

A web-based questionnaire was designed and administered to 1,889 members of the College of Psychiatrists to investigate the effects of patient suicide on the emotional well-being and clinical practice of psychiatrists, the resources psychiatrists feel would be helpful before and after a patient suicide and psychiatrists’ attitudes to suicide and suicide prevention including their perceptions of institutional and societal pressures. Data from 232 respondents showed that the key personal and professional impacts of a patient’s suicide included pre-occupation with suicide, decreased self-confidence, sadness, burnout, desire for career change/break and fear of negative events following the suicide. Support from colleagues and line managers was often identified as being helpful in the aftermath of patient death by suicide, however, enhanced occupational supports to assist with the formal processes and experiences after patient suicide are needed.

THE TRUTH ABOUT SUICIDE & THE IMPACT ON THOSE BEREAVED (INCLUDING CLINICIANS)

DR RACHEL GIBBONS, CHAIR OF THE WORKING GROUP ON THE EFFECT OF SUICIDE & HOMICIDE ON PSYCHIATRISTS, RCPSYCH

Suicide is something that is at the back of our minds in a lot of our work with patients. Given its importance and the fear that it generates, it is surprising that there is very little known about its nature or aetiology. This talk aims to confront the ‘Truth’ about suicide. It will look at the understanding of suicidal states of mind and test this by looking at real cases. What leads someone to take their own life? Can it be prevented? The profound effect the suicide of a patient has on the clinician working with them will be discussed. Knowledge gained about how to process and work with this trauma will be shared.

PANEL DISCUSSION: PROFESSOR ANNE DOHERTY & PROFESSOR AOIBHINN LYNCH

12:30 – 13:00 | WE ARE MADE OF STAR STUFF                                                     

LOCATION: LIR SUITE

CHAIRED BY PROF MARY CANNON

DAME JOCELYN BELL BURNELL, VISITING ACADEMIC, OXFORD UNIVERSITY

Professor Burnell will look at the main chemical elements that are found in our bodies and explain how these chemical elements were created.

13:00 – 14:00 | LUNCH

14:00 – 15:15 | PARALLEL SESSIONS – PART 1

SESSION 1 | SKILLS AND PILLS – AN ACCESSIBLE AND INCLUSIVE PATHWAY FOR YOUNG PEOPLE WITH ADHD

LOCATION: LIR SUITE

CHAIRED BY: DR GILLIAN HUGHES

DR RUTH BUCKMASTER, SENIOR CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGIST, LINN DARA CAMHS

DR MARIE BOILSON, CONSULTANT PSYCHIATRIST IN ADULT ADHD, DUBLIN AND SCOTTISH NATIONAL AUTISM TEAM

Recommendations are that individuals with ADHD have a comprehensive, holistic shared treatment plan that addresses psychological, behavioural, and occupational or educational needs (NICE, 2018). ADHD focused individual and group psychoeducation programmes can help people with ADHD to understand their diagnosis, to identify their ADHD related strengths and learn tools to manage their challenges. This presentation will provide an overview of non-pharmacological interventions offered in a specialist ADHD CAMHS service and the background research.

Emerging adulthood, from the age of 18 to 29, is a critical complex developmental phase where the gap between child and adult services needs to be bridged and occurs at a time of critical change in most young people and their families lives.

We know however that very few of those who need ongoing treatment for their ADHD successfully transfer to adult services.  The core difficulties of ADHD make coping with transition even harder. Studies such as TRACK, CATCH-us and Ready Steady Go programmes provide good  foundations to translate evidence into practice.

The National Clinical Programme for Adult ADHD has relatively recently been launched and offers an opportunity to start to develop and evaluate processes to support transition and understand patient need at this formative life cycle stage.”

The second speaker will present on this critical transition for young adults with ADHD and the challenges associated. 

SESSION 2 |  MEDICAL LEADERSHIP SKILLS           

LOCATION: CONFERENCE ROOM 6

CHAIRED BY: DR KEVIN LALLY & DR EIMEAR COUNIHAN

PROFESSOR DINESH BHUGRA, PROFESSOR EMERITUS OF MENTAL HEALTH & CULTURAL DIVERSITY, KINGS COLLEGE LONDON

Medical leadership skills are one of the core skills expected of doctors. Working in teams can lead to doctors taking on these roles albeit sometimes involuntarily. Doctors possess certain leadership skills by virtue of their training These skills are part of professional skills that doctors have. Are leaders born or made? Of course, certain skills are innate, and others can be learnt. Psychiatrists by virtue of training are good at understanding interpersonal relationships and working. This skill set is helpful in not only delivering best available evidence-based care to our patients and working with their families but also advocating for them with the policymakers and others. Doctors have a dual responsibility in advocacy both as members of the society and as professionals.

Leadership and management skills have a degree of overlap but mean very different things with different theoretical sets. Leaders at institutional and organisational levels must possess vision, passion, courage, and communicate these through good communication skills in conveying these.

Clinical leadership is essential when planning, designing, and delivering healthcare plan healthcare which is accessible.  For clinicians, leadership skills are essential in clinical teams or institutions. This workshop explores theoretical underpinnings and skills needed in leadership positions.

SESSION 3 | TRAVELLER MENTAL HEALTH                                         

LOCATION: CONFERENCE ROOM 7

CHAIRED BY: PROF MARY CANNON & MR JOHN HOEY

MS ANNE-MARIE GAYNOR, MENTAL HEALTH COORDINATOR, NO SHAME PROJECT, INVOLVE YOUTH SERVICES

A MULTI-DISCIPLINARY APPROACH TO PROVIDING SERVICES TO THE TRAVELLER COMMUNITY

MR JOHN O’BRIEN, NATIONAL TRAVELLER MENTAL HEALTH SERVICE

MR WILLIAM LAWRENCE, EXCHANGE HOUSE, DUBLIN

Exchange House Ireland is a national Traveller service providing leading front line supports to members of the Traveller Community in Youth, Education, Mental Health, Family Support, Prison In-Reach, Addiction and Community Development

15:15 – 15:45 | COFFEE BREAK

15:45 – 17:00 | PARALLEL SESSIONS – PART 2

SESSION 4 | SOCIAL COMMUNICATION AND INTERACTION: WHAT AUTISTIC PEOPLE WANT YOU TO KNOW

LOCTION: LIR SUITE

CHAIRED BY: DR LINDA O’ROURKE

MS HOLLY SUTHERLAND, AUTISM RESEARCHER & DOCTORAL CANDIDATE, UNIVERSITY OF EDINBURGH

Persistent difficulties with social communication and social interaction” is a key part of the diagnostic criteria for autism. However, recent research findings and accounts by autistic self-advocates are challenging this framing. These findings and accounts suggest that difficulties are not due to a deficit on the part of the autistic person, but due to mutual misunderstanding between autistic and non-autistic people (the “double empathy problem”). If we want to understand why these misunderstandings occur, we have to first understand how autistic people experience social communication and interaction – what their expectations are, what they find difficult, and their perspectives on non-autistic social communication and interaction. This talk will cover key findings on this topic from two focus groups with autistic adults, and will illustrate how this can be used to improve communication and interactions between autistic and non-autistic people.

SESSION 5 | INCLUSION HEALTH                                               

LOCATION: CONFERENCE ROOM 6

DR EILEEN SWEENEY, CONSULTANT PSYCHIATRIST, HSE INCLUSION MENTAL HEALTH TEAM, DUBLIN

DR CLIONA NI CEALLAIGH, CLINICAL LEAD, INCLUSION SERVICE, ST JAMES’S HOSPITAL, DUBLIN

Dr Ni Ceallaigh will discuss the relationship between social inclusion / exclusion and health, showcasing a case study to demonstrate the challenges of medical / psychiatric / primary care / voluntary sector boundaries when looking after socially excluded people. Dr Sweeney will look at local mental health data driving the new Inclusion Mental Health Team (IMHT) service. They will both explore the competing tensions impacting service design and how they respond with their models of care, acute and community.

SESSION 6 | PROGRESSING DIVERSITY, EQUALITY & INCLUSION IN THE HSE             

CHAIRED BY: DR PATRICIA WALSH

LOCATION: CONFERENCE ROOM 7

MS MARIA BARRY, DIVERSITY EQUALITY & INCLUSION MANAGER, HSE

MS KELLIE O’FARRELL, SENIOR OCCUPATIONAL THERAPIST & CHAIR, LE CHÉILE NETWORK, HSE

Ms Barry will provide an overview of how the HSE is progressing the principles of Diversity, Equality and Inclusion (DEI) in its’ workforce, describing the key priorities and actions in the HSE’s DEI strategy and the role of the DEI team. Ms O’Farrell will provide an overview of the Le Chéile Network, the HSE’s network for staff with disabilities, her role as Chair of the Network and benefits of Network membership.

17:00 – 17:10 | ANNOUNCEMENT OF NCHD POSTER PRESENTATION WINNER

17:15 – 18:00 | COLLEGE OF PSYCHIATRISTS OF IRELAND AGM

19:30 – Late | CPSYCHI CONFERENCE DINNER                                                                 

 (Dinner ticket required, Pre-booking essential)

DRINKS RECEPTION FOLLOWED BY CONFERENCE DINNER

FROM 9.00 | REGISTRATION 

LOCATION: FOYER

POSTER EXHIBITION

LOCATION: AOIFE SUITE

09:50 – 10:00 | WELCOME ADDRESS

LOCATION: LIR SUITE

PROFESSOR MARY CANNON | COLLEGE OF PSYCHIATRISTS OF IRELAND VICE-PRESIDENT & CONFERENCE ACADEMIC COORDINATOR

10.00 – 11.30 | EQUALITY, DIVERSITY & INCLUSION IN MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES

CHAIRED BY: DR MIA MCLAUGHLIN

MS NICOLA BRYNE, CEO SHINE

Ms Byrne will talk about the work that Shine does and her experience of delivering in an authentic way on issues such as Equality, Diversity and Inclusion. She will use practical and real examples to talk about experiences in delivering on these issues. She will put this in the context of the real-world experiences, ethical and practical considerations, and reflections on the experience.

 

FIONA COYLE, MENTAL HEALTH REFORM

11.15 – 11.30 | PANEL DISCUSSION

DR MIA MCLAUGHLIN & DR KEVIN LALLY

11:30 – 12:00 | COFFEE BREAK

12:00 – 12:45 | EQUALITY, DIVERSITY & INCLUSION

LOCATION: LIR SUITE

CHAIRED BY: PROF MARY CANNON

DR SUZANNE CROWE, PRESDIENT, MEDICAL COUNCIL

Dr Crowe will present from the perspective of the Medical Council on how Doctors can contribute towards equality, diversity and inclusion (ED&I) in medicine; highlighting Medical Council workforce data with recommendations on what else could be done to tackle inequality in the medical profession.

12:45 – 13:50 | LUNCH

13:50 – 16:00 | EATING DISORDERS: CLINICAL SKILLS AND ACADEMIC RESEARCH OVERVIEW

LOCATION: LIR SUITE

CHAIRED BY: PROF FIONA MCNICHOLAS

PROFESSOR FIONA MC NICHOLAS, CONSULTANT CHILD & ADOLESCENT PSYCHIATRIST, OUR LADY’S CHILDREN HOSPITAL, CRUMLIN, DUBLIN

PROFESSOR SIOBHAN MACHALE, CONSULTANT LIAISON PSYCHIATRIST, BEAUMONT HOSPITAL, DUBLIN

DR ANTIONETTE D’ALTON, CONSULTANT CHILD & ADOLESCENT PSYCHIATRIST

DR HARRIET RYAN, OUR LADY’S CHILDREN HOSPITAL, CRUMLIN, DUBLIN

DR MARIA ROMANOS, CONSULTANT GENERAL ADULT PSYCHIATRIST, ST JOHN OF GOD HOSPITAL, DUBLIN

Eating disorders (ED) are serious and life-threatening conditions typically presenting at ages 15-24. They are becoming increasingly prevalent, especially in younger children and in boys, where it is recognised to be atypical in presentation, both in terms of extent and nature of eating pathology, exercise and compensatory behaviours with many falling short of full diagnostic criteria.

Recognition and assessment of their clinical presentation can be challenging for clinicians in primary care settings, where consultation time is short and experience with eating disorders limited. The early detection and appropriate referral of individuals with ED is essential for timely management.  Failure to consider an ED diagnosis in children and adults who present with extreme weight loss may have serious immediate and long-term implications. However, failure to consider other non-organic causes of weight loss may be equally detrimental to one’s health.

Using a number of varied clinical cases presenting to paediatric and adult services, and adopting an interactive approach, this workshop offers the attendees an interesting and stimulating opportunity to consider a variety of differential diagnosis for weight loss, food restriction and over exercising. The attendees will work in small groups and will engage in treatment planning.

Each presenter will outline a case (5-7 min) and use as the basis for small group discussion (10mins) addressing various learning objectives. The types of ED are not listed to allow the attendees consider the wide range of potential differential diagnosis. They will cover feeding and eating disorders, and the management of chronic as well as more acute onset illness.

16:00 | CLOSE

SPEAKERS

Maria Barry edit
Maria Barry

Maria Barry is a Diversity, Equality and Inclusion Manager in the HSE and a registered pharmacist.  She has over 14 years’ experience working in both the public and private healthcare sectors.  Prior to the HSE, Maria worked in hospital pharmacy in a large national paediatric teaching hospital. Maria subsequently occupied senior medical business roles in Novartis Ireland and voluntarily co-chaired the Novartis Diversity and Inclusion Council.  Maria holds a BSc Pharmacy degree, a Masters in Clinical Pharmacy, an MBA and a Masters in Diversity, Equality and Inclusion.

BHUGRA, DINESH Edit
Dinesh Bhugra

Dinesh Bhugra CBE is currently Professor Emeritus of Mental Health and Cultural Diversity, Kings College London. He has published widely in the field of  cultural psychiatry, sexual dysfunction and service development. He has authored/co-authored over 500 scientific papers, chapters , editorials and 40 books. Several of his books have won awards and gone into multiple editions. Three of his books  have been translated into Mandarin and Japanese. His Oxford Textbook for Public Mental Health won Book of the Year award last year. In the same year Practical Cultural Psychiatry was highly recommended. He is the Editor of the International Journal of Social Psychiatry,  and International Review of Psychiatry. Currently he is  Non-Executive Director of Sussex Partnership NHS Foundation Trust.

BYRNE, NICOLA edit
Nicola Byrne

Nicola Byrne is the CEO of Shine, a national organisation that provides information and support for people affected by mental health difficulties in Ireland. She is also a registered social worker with over 25 years of experience in the mental health sector, working in various roles such as practice, policy, research, advocacy, change management and service delivery. She is passionate about promoting individual and family recovery, challenging stigma and discrimination, and influencing positive change in mental health policy and practice. Nicola is an experienced leader who strives to make Shine a voice for mental health in Ireland. Under her leadership, the charity Shine operates frontline services for people with lived experience and their supporter and delivers two important national programmes: See Change and Headline. See Change is Ireland’s organisation dedicated to ending mental health stigma, and Headline is Ireland’s national programme for responsible reporting and representation of mental health in the media.

O'FARRELL, KELLIE
Kellie O'Farrell

Kellie O’Farrell, MSc, MA, BA (Hons), is a senior occupational therapist in Primary Care adult services. She holds the position of Chairperson of the HSE’s Le Chéile Network, which focuses on supporting staff with disabilities. Kellie has experience working in paediatric, intellectual disability, community care, and palliative care services. Prior to becoming an occupational therapist, Kellie pursued an MSc in Television Journalism at Goldsmiths University of London. After completing her studies, she worked in the UK broadcasting industry. Furthermore, she actively volunteered in the non-profit sector in the UK, advocating for improved psycho-social support services for burn survivors. Kellie is very passionate about campaigning for equality for people with visible differences and has been involved in a number of public awareness raising campaigns.

Hollie edit
Hollie Sutherland

Hollie Sutherland E.A; is an autistic autism researcher and doctoral candidate at the University of Edinburgh. Her PhD focuses on autistic social communication and interaction – between autistic people and from the autistic perspective. She is currently studying social interactions and communication in day support services for autistic adults with high support needs. She is interested in neurodiversity frameworks, lived experience research, mixed methods, and bridging the double empathy gap.

BOILSON, MARIE edit
Marie Boilson

Maria Boilson is a consultant with specialist registration in general adult psychiatry working in adult ADHD in South Central Dublin with the NCP. She has worked in Scotland for most of her career as an adult psychiatrist and medical manager. She was chair of the Adult ADHD SIG in the Scottish Division of the Royal College of Psychiatry for 10 years and seconded to the Scottish National Autism Implementation Team, a government funded team providing national research and teaching on Neurodevelopmental disorders based at Queen Margaret University, to develop an adult ADHD pathway for Scotland. She continues to work on a part time basis with this team.

Ruth edit
Ruth Buckmaster

Ruth Buckmaster is a Chartered Clinical Psychologist registered with the Psychological Society of Ireland (PSI). Ruth completed her BA in Psychology in University College Dublin (UCD), her MSc in Applied Psychology in Trinity College Dublin (TCD) and PhD in Clinical Psychology in UCD. She has worked across a number of public and private health settings with children and adults in both Ireland and Australia. Ruth currently works as a senior clinical psychologist on the ADMiRE ADHD specialist pathway in Linn Dara CAMHS. Ruth is passionate about working with young people with ADHD and is a member of the ADHD working group within the PSI. Ruth is a contributing author of the PSI Guidelines for Psychologists Working with ADHD, which is due to be released in the coming months.

BURNELL, JOCELYN BELL
Jocelyn Bell Burnell

Jocelyn Bell Burnell inadvertently discovered pulsars as a graduate student in radio astronomy in Cambridge, opening up a new branch of astrophysics – work recognised by the award of a Nobel Prize to her supervisor. She has subsequently worked in many roles in many branches of astronomy, working part-time while raising a family. She is now a Visiting Academic in Oxford. She has been President of the UK’s Royal Astronomical Society, in 2008 became the first female President of the Institute of Physics for the UK and Ireland, and in 2014 the first female President of the Royal Society of Edinburgh. She was one of the small group of women scientists that set up the Athena SWAN scheme.

Fiona Coyle
Fiona Coyle

Fiona Coyle is the Chief Executive Officer of Mental Health Reform, a position she assumed in 2020. As CEO, Fiona provides strategic leadership and management to a national coalition dedicated to driving change in the mental health sector. Prior to joining Mental Health Reform, Fiona served as the Director of END FGM Europe for two years. Her career spans across national and international civil society organizations, where she has focused on strategic and political planning, as well as implementing multi-stakeholder advocacy initiatives. Fiona held the role of International Advocacy Manager at IPPF European Network, leading the federation’s engagement with European institutions. She has also served as the network coordinator for EuroNGOs and as a Programme Manager at Dóchas, the Irish national platform for Development NGOs. Fiona brings extensive experience and expertise in driving transformative change and advancing mental health advocacy efforts.

CROWE, SUZANNE edit
Suzanne Crowe

Suzanne Crowe was first elected to the Medical Council in 2018 and re-elected in 2023. Dr Crowe was elected as President of the Medical Council in 2021. Dr Crowe graduated in Medicine from Trinity College Dublin, followed by Specialist training in Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine with the College of Anaesthesiologists. After a Fellowship in Paediatric Intensive Care Medicine in the Royal Children’s Hospital Melbourne, she took up a Consultant post in Anaesthesia with a Special Interest in Paediatrics in Tallaght Hospital, Dublin. In 2014, Dr Crowe moved to Children’s Health Ireland, Crumlin Hospital as a Paediatric Intensivist. She is a Senior Lecturer in Paediatrics in Trinity College Dublin and has an interest in bereavement studies and medical ethics. She is Associate Clinical Professor in UCD School of Medicine in the division of Women and Children’s Health. Dr Crowe is a board trustee for three charities, the Down Syndrome Centre, Cheshire Ireland and LGBT Ireland. Dr Crowe is Chair of the National Screening Advisory Committee.

GIBBONS, RACHEL
Rachel Gibbons

Rachel Gibbons has worked in the NHS over the past 20 years in various psychiatric settings as a consultant psychiatrist and consultant medical psychotherapist. She is a psychoanalyst and group analyst and current Co-Chair of the Patient Safety Group, Chair of the Working Group on the Effect of Suicide and Homicide on Psychiatrists and Vice-Chair of the Psychotherapy Faculty, at the Royal College of Psychiatrists.  She has been working on suicide over the last 14 years. She has been facilitating a Suicide Group for consultant psychiatrists for the last 14 years. She led the development of the first global guidance for all mental health organisations for the pastoral care of staff following the death by suicide of a patient. This guidance is now in the new National Suicide Prevention Strategy for England.

O’BRIEN, JOHN edit
John O'Brien

John O’Brien has been working in the Community & Public Health arena since 2013. John’s experience has seen him work on community led interventions in child and adult obesity, men’s health, mental health & suicide prevention. His work has predominantly been in the field of health inequalities working with communities from marginalised and lower socio economic backgrounds. Since 2017, John has been working with the Traveller community. John currently manages the National Traveller Mental Health Service at Exchange House Ireland National Traveller Service.

CORCORAN, PAUL
Paul Corcoran

Paul Corcoran is an epidemiologist and is currently Head of Research with the National Suicide Research Foundation where he has worked, on and off, since it was established in 1994. He is also a Senior Lecturer at University College Cork. Paul has co-authored approximately 200 peer-reviewed journal articles and has contributed to the development and evaluation of Irish suicide prevention strategies.

Image Ann Marie Gaynor
Ann Marie Gaynor

Ann Marie Gaynor has a long history working with the Travelling community. She worked as the Pre-School manager back in 2003 for seven years. The pre-school was on situated on the halting site in Longford. Here she managed staff all of whom was from the Travelling community. She then studied psychiatric nursing in Athlone IT. She spent six years working in the Central Mental Hospital where she experienced a great increase in members of the Travelling community becoming inpatients from the prison system. Further study saw her receive a postgrad  diploma in Mental Health Promotion. Her role as National Mental Health Youth Worker was created of the back of funding from HeadStart.

Patrick MacDonagh
Patrick MacDonagh

Patrick MacDonagh is a youth worker with involve. He is a also a member of the Travelling Community. Patrick was one of the founders and developers of the ‘No Shame’ mental health board game. This board game has been an award winning development in Traveller Mental Health and it is aimed at breaking down stigma amongst the community and helping Travellers talk about what is on their minds around Mental Health.

MACHALE, SIOBHAN
Siobhan Machale

Siobhan Machale has worked as a Consultant Liaison Psychiatrist for 25 years, initially in the Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, before returning to her current post in Beaumont Hospital in 2006. She is an Associate Clinical Professor in the Royal College of Surgeons of Ireland, and a Fellow of the Royal College of Psychiatrists, Royal College of Physicians of Ireland and the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh. As a Liaison Psychiatrist, her primary role is in the care and management of the mental health needs of patients in the general hospital setting, including patients with severe medical sequelae of restrictive eating disorders. She has been a High Court appointed Ward of Court Office Medical Visitor for Eating Disorders.

DALTON, ANTOINETTE edit
Antoinette D'alton

Antoinette D’alton is a consultant Child & Adolescent Psychiatrist. She trained in the West of Ireland and in Leicester. Antoinette has worked as a consultant in CAMHS based in the Midland Regional Hospital, Mullingar for over 20 years and as a liaison consultant in Children’s Health Ireland at Crumlin since 2014. She has a long standing interest in Liaison Psychiatry and Eating Disorders, especially the therapeutic aspects.

Romanos
María Romanos

María Romanos completed her studies in Spain and moved to London where se completed her training in psychiatry becoming a MRCPsy in 2000 and a Forensic Psychiatrist in 2004. Maria worked as a consultant in Forensic Psychiatry in London, The John Howard Medium Secure Unit, for 4 years. I 2008 moved to Dublin and worked for about a year and a half in St Brendan’s hospital low secure women service. In April 2012 moved to work to St John of God Hospital and in 2017 became the consultant responsible of the Eating Disorder Services at SJOGH. María has especial interest in developmental disorders.

POSTER PRESENTATIONS

  1. ENHANCING THE MANAGEMENT OF PATIENTS ENGAGED IN CRACK COCAINE USE AT THE NATIONAL DRUG TREATMENT CENTRE

SARAH BRENNAN1, MIKE SCULLY2

1 Mid North Kildare Community Mental Health Team, Celbridge Health Centre, Co Kildare
2 National Drug Treatment Centre, Pearse Street, Dublin

 

  1. DOUBLE-BLINDED PRESCRIBING? AN AUDIT ON MEDICATION RECONCILIATION IN A COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY SERVICE

AISHLING E. COLLINS1, GABRIELA M. SORIN2

1 Linn Dara CAMHS Inpatient Unit
2 Mental Health Addiction & Intellectual Disability Service (MHAIDS l Capital, Hutt Valley and Wairarapa, Wellington, New Zealand

 

  1. EXAMINING THE RESEARCH NEEDS OF HIGHER SPECIALIST TRAINEES IN PSYCHIATRY IN IRELAND: A MIXED METHODS STUDY

EIMEAR COUNIHAN1, CORNELIA CAREY2, ANNA FEENEY3, KEVIN LALLY4, CIARA O’CONNOR5, ANNE M. DOHERTY6,7

1 National Forensic Mental Health Service, Dublin
2 Cluain Mhuire Mental Health Service, Blackrock, Dublin
3 St Vincent’s Hospital, Fairview, Dublin
4 National Drug Treatment Centre, Pearse St, Dublin
5 St. Patrick’s University Hospital, Dublin
6 School of Medicine, University College Dublin
7 Mater Misericordiae Hospital, Dublin

 

  1. EVALUATION OF A NEW PSYCHO-ONCOLOGY SERVICE IN A DESIGNATED CANCER CENTRE IN IRELAND

GENEVIEVE CRUDDEN1, ALFONSO GOUVEIA2, EDEL FENTON3, KATE CORRIGAN4, EIMEAR MCMAHON3, ANNE DOHERTY3

1 National Maternity Hospital, Dublin
2 Psychiatry Service, Local Health Unit of Baixo, Alentejo, Beja, Portugal
3 Psycho-Oncology, Mater University Hospital, Dublin

 

  1. AN ANALYSIS OF GENERAL PRACTITIONER REFERRALS TO A CHILD AND ADOLESCENT MENTAL HEALTH SERVICE: BEFORE, DURING AND AFTER THE COVID 19 PANDEMIC

PATRICK FITZPATRICK1, ANKITA GEORGE2, FIONNUALA LYNCH3, FIONA MCNICHOLAS4

1 Ballyfermot Mental Health Service, Dublin
2 School of Medicine, UCD
3 Lucena Clinic, Belgard Square, Tallaght, Dublin
4 Lucena Clinic, Rathgar, Dublin

 

  1. PERSPECTIVES ON USING A CELEBRITY NARRATIVE TO TEACH THE PSYCHIATRIC FORMULATION TO FINAL YEAR MEDICAL STUDENTS

DAVID HICKEY1, JOHN MCFARLAND2

1 CAMHS, Thurles Primary Care Centre, Thurles, Co Tipperary
2 Stella Maris Mental Health Centre, Lisdoonvarna, Co Clare

 

  1. THE IMPLEMENTATION OF PHYSICAL HEALTH MONITORING FOR OUTPATIENTS ATTENDING COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES

ELAINE JOY1, KATHRYN CORRIGAN1, ALLYS GUÉRANDEL1

1 St Vincent’s University Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin

 

  1. ADHERENCE TO STANDARDS OF INDIVIDUAL CARE PLANS (ICP) IN A COMMUNITY CAMHS TEAM – A COMPLETE AUDIT CYCLE

ORLAITH KEARNEY1, DANIEL LEAHY2, GERRY RAFFERTY2

1 Acute Adult Mental Health Unit, Cork University Hospital, Dublin
2 CAMHS, Unit 9 St Stephen’s Hospital, Cork

 

  1. ‘THE AGONY AND THE ECSTASY OF GHB’ A 10 YEAR REVIEW OF EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT PRESENTATIONS INVOLVING GHB MISUSE– A CHALLENGE FOR LIAISON PSYCHIATRY

SAN KIM1, VICTORIA ADEDEJI2, GENEVIEVE CRUDDEN2, ANNE DOHERTY3, MAAMEI LEBOGANG MALALE2, ADRIAN MOUGHTY2

1 CAMHS Dublin North Inner City and Clontarf Team, 44 North Great George’s St, Dublin
2 Unaffiliated
3 63 Eccles Street, Dublin

 

  1. ASSOCIATIONS BETWEEN ADIPOSITY MEASURES AND DEPRESSION AND WELL-BEING SCORES: A CROSS-SECTIONAL ANALYSIS OF MIDDLE TO OLDER-AGED ADULTS

CAOIMHE LONERGAN1, SEÁN MILLAR2, ZUBAIR KABIR2

1 South Lee Mental Health Services, Ravenscourt Day Centre, St. Finbarr’s Hospital, Cork
2 Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College Cork

 

  1. ASSOCIATION BETWEEN PERSONALITY DIFFICULTIES AND ELECTROCONVULSIVE THERAPY OUTCOMES IN DEPRESSION

CATHAL MCCAFFREY1,2, ANA JELOVAC1,2, MARTHA FINNEGAN3, GABRIELE GUSCIUTE4, DECLAN MCLOUGHLIN1,2

1 St. Patrick’s Hospital, James’ St, Dublin
2 Trinity College Dublin
3 Tallaght University Hospital, Dublin
4 School of Medicine, Trinity College Dublin

 

  1. THE IMPACT AND ACCEPTABILITY OF METACOGNITIVE TRAINING (MCT) FOR PSYCHOSIS WITH COGITO APP -A MIXED METHODS STUDY IN AN IRISH COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTHCARE SETTING

ROISIN MCCAFFERTY1, KATARINA TIMULAKOVA2

1 Department of Old Age Psychiatry, 61 Eccles Street, Dublin
2 Strand House, Philipsburgh Avenue, Dublin

  1. IMPROVING THE UPTAKE OF NALOXONE IN PATIENTS RECEIVING OPIOID SUBSTITUTION THERAPY

RUAIRI MCNICHOLAS1, NICOLA SWEENEY2, ROSS DOUGAN3, EMMA MOONEY4, MOLLY AHERN2, FIONA FENTON2

1 Exchange Hall, Belgard Square, Tallaght, Dublin
2 National Drug Treatment Centre, Pearse St, Dublin
3 St John of God Hospital, Dublin
4 St John of God Community Mental Health Service, Newtownpark Ave, Blackrock, Dublin

 

  1. AN AUDIT TO REVIEW COMPLIANCE WITH ACUTE BEHAVIOURAL DISTURBANCE GUIDELINE

KATE MULHOLLAND1, EMMANUEL TANYOUS1, PHILIPPA RENTON1

1 Adult Mental Health Unit, Mayo University Hospital, Mayo

 

  1. AUDIT ON THE APPROPRIATE USE OF BENZODIAZEPINES IN AN INPATIENT COHORT IN ST. EDMUNDSBURY HOSPITAL

SEAN BARRA O’LEARY1, SARAH PRASAD2

1 St. Patrick’s University Hospital, Dublin
2 St. Edmundsbury Hospital, Lucan, Co Dublin

 

  1. MANAGEMENT OF PSYCHOTROPIC-INDUCED PRIAPISM WITH PENILE IMPLANT SURGERY: A DESCRIPTIVE CASE SERIES

AOIBHEANN RAINFORD1, PONNUSAMY MOHAN1, BRIAN HALLAHAN2

1 Beaumont Hospital, Dublin
2 Galway University Hospital, Galway

 

  1. OMEGA-3 POLYUNSATURATED FATTY ACIDS IN THE MANAGEMENT OF METABOLIC SYNDROME IN SCHIZOPHRENIA AND OTHER PSYCHOTIC DISORDERS: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW

AOIBHEANN RAINFORD1, TOM DOYLE1, BRIAN HALLAHAN2

1 Beaumont Hospital, Dublin
2 Galway University Hospital, Galway

 

  1. CASE SERIES OF ADMISSIONS TO A DESIGNATED TRAUMA CENTRE FOLLOWING SUICIDAL ACTS

CLAIRE SMITH1, GENEVIEVE CRUDDEN2, KATE CORRIGAN3, AINE RICHARDS4, ANNE DOHERTY4, ANA MARIA CLARKE4, LINDA O’ROURKE4

1 Programme for the Homeless, Usher’s Island, Dublin
2 National Maternity Hospital, Dublin
3 St Vincent’s Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin
4 Department of Psychiatry, Mater Misercordiae University Hospital, Dublin

 

  1. EFFICACY OF INTRANASAL ESKETAMINE IN A SAMPLE OF PATIENTS WITH TREATMENT RESISTANT DEPRESSION

AILBHE TUMMON1, SHANE MCINERNEY1

1 Adult Acute Mental Health Unit, Galway University Hospital

 

  1. MENTAL HEALTH SYMPTOMS AND LEVELS OF SOCIAL SATISFACTION IN EXPECTING AND NEW FATHERS AND CO-PARENTS

RALPH TWOMEY1, RICHARD DUFFY2, MIKE GEARY2, FIONA HANRAHAN2, EMMA MCBRIDE3, EMER CROKE3, AJITA RAMAN3, CHRISTINE CORCORAN4

1 Cluain Mhuire Mental Health Service, Blackrock, Dublin
2 Rotunda Hospital, Dublin
3 Clinical Midwife Manager 2
4 Clinical Midwife Manager 3

 

 

  1. SEVERE AND RESISTANT BENZODIAZEPINE WITHDRAWAL SYMPTOMS IN OLDER ADULTS AFTER SUDDEN DISCONTINUATION OF FLURAZEPAM FROM THE MARKET (DALMANE): A CASE SERIES

VIJO JOEL VERGHESE1, ZAFIR NISAR1, ANNE GALLAGHER1

1 Teach de Hide, Golf Links Road, Roscommon

 

  1. LESSONS FROM A CRISIS: A THEMATIC ANALYSIS ON OCCUPATIONAL STRESS IN STAFF IN AN ACUTE PAEDIATRIC TEACHING HOSPITAL IN IRELAND

SHAY WARD1, GRAINNE DONOHUE2,3, JOHANNA MURRAY3, FIONA MCNICHOLAS3,4,5

1 Lucena Clinic, Belgard Square, Tallaght, Dublin
2 St Patrick’s University Hospital, Dublin
3 University College Dublin
4 Lucena Clinic, Orwell Road, Rathgar, Dublin
5 Children’s Health Ireland, Crumlin Hospital, Dublin

 

  1. DEVELOPMENT OF A CRISIS RESOLUTION TEAM: REFLECTING ON YEAR ONE OF OUR PILOT PROJECT

LESLEY YAO1, MOHANAD ELTIEB1, ELIZABETH GETHINGS1

1 Crisis Team, St Columba’s, Clarion Road, Sligo

 

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IMPACT OF DIETARY FIBER ON GUT MICROBIOTA COMPOSITION, FUNCTION AND GUT-BRAIN-MODULES IN HEATHY ADULTS

DAVID ANTOINE LACHMANSINGH1,3,4, JOHN F. CRAYN2,3,4, GERARD CLARKE1,4, AONGHUS LAVELLE3,4

1 Department of Psychiatry and Neurobehavioral Science, Biosciences Research Institute, University College Cork
2 Office of Vice President for research & Innovation, Food Science Building, University College Cork
3 Department of Anatomy & Neuroscience, Western Gateway Building, University College Cork
4 APC Microbiome Ireland, University College Cork

 

VENUE